Home » reading

Tag: reading

Table Completion Practice 3

In the IELTS Reading table completion task, you must fill in a table using words from the reading passage that you have been provided with. To do this, you must ensure that you comprehend the details of the text, that you can locate information in the reading text and that you choose the correct words.

Bilingual People Can Switch Between Different Personalities

Let’s start with the fact that there are three types of bilingual (or multilingual) people:

  • Compound bilinguals. These are people who use two or more languages from their birth and as a result, have several linguistic codes simultaneously.
  • Coordinate bilinguals. These are people who were speaking a single language at birth but learned a second one during the early stages of development (teenage to mid-twenties). As a result, they can easily shift between linguistic codes but there’s a dominant ‘native’ one.
  • Subordinate bilinguals. These are people who didn’t speak a second language to the later stages of life. After learning it in the adult age, they still have a single linguistic code, and filter the ‘alien’ language through it.

Timing and conditions for those types may be individual but that’s highly unlikely that you will become a compound bilingual by learning a second language at the age of 40.

Compound and Coordinate bilinguals are prone to have different personalities for every language they know. It’s possible because in the process of learning their brain is still very plastic due to the young age, so they use a lot of their right hemisphere — which is primarily in charge of emotional perception. It means that they acquire an emotional connection with a language and develop their own distinct character in it, not just learn a set of words and grammar rules. Every language has its own peculiar tones and shades, so by matching your persona with the nature of the language you simply go through the process of adaptation.

Source: https://medium.com/@dgrybach/bilingual-people-can-switch-between-different-personalities-5d012c8b3e4

Question

Complete the table below with information from the passage above. Choose no more than 4 words to fill in for each answer. Write the answers in the boxes below.

Key Vocabulary:

  1. linguistic: Connected with language or the study of language.
  2. simultaneously: Happening or being done at exactly the same time.
  3. shift: To slightly move or change from one position or direction to another.
  4. dominant: More important, strong, or noticeable.
  5. prone: Likely to suffer from, do, or experience something unpleasant or regrettable.
  6. perception: A belief or opinion, often held by many people and based on how things seem.
  7. acquire: To get something.
  8. peculiar: Unusual and strange, sometimes in an unpleasant way.
  9. persona: The particular type of character that a person seems to have and that is often different from their real or private character.
  10. adaptation: The process of changing to suit different conditions.

Answers

 

Table Completion Practice 2

In the IELTS Reading table completion task, you must fill in a table using words from the reading passage that you have been provided with. To do this, you must ensure that you comprehend the details of the text, that you can locate information in the reading text and that you choose the correct words.

The Characteristics of 12 Architectural Styles From Antiquity to the Present Day

 Classic

Classical architecture was constructed in Ancient Greece between the 7th and 4th century BC. It is best known for its large temples built in stone. The greatest work of Classical architecture is the Parthenon. Built in the Acropolis of Athens in the 5th century BC, the Parthenon exhibits striking characteristics.

Romanesque

Developed in Europe between the 6th and 9th centuries, this architectural style has a great relation to its historical context. In a period when European countries were at war and worried about protecting against invasions, the buildings, inspired by the Republic of Ancient Rome, were characterized by heavy walls and minimal openings in semicircular arches. Its main exemplars were the churches built during this period.

Baroque

Beginning in the 16th century, Baroque architecture can also be seen in religious buildings. Making use of ornaments and elements that sought to establish a dramatic sense — especially by contrasting light and dark — Baroque architecture viewed structural elements as platforms for decoration.

Source: https://www.archdaily.com/900027/the-characteristics-of-12-architectural-styles-from-antiquity-to-the-present-day

Question

Complete the table below with information from the passage above. Choose no more than 1 word to fill in for each answer. Write the answers in the boxes below.

Key Vocabulary:

  1. architecture: another name for buildings
  2. constructed: built
  3. temples: a name for certain religious buildings
  4. striking: something that attracts attention
  5. invasions: when a large number of people (such as soldiers) enter a place that belongs to someone else
  6. minimal: small amount of
  7. semi-circular: half-moon shaped
  8. exemplars: typical examples of something
  9. ornaments: objects that are used for decoration, such as a small figurine
  10. sought: looked for
  11. structural: related to the structure of something

Answers

 

Table Completion Practice 1

In the IELTS Reading table completion task, you must fill in a table using words from the reading passage that you have been provided with. To do this, you must ensure that you comprehend the details of the text, that you can locate information in the reading text and that you choose the correct words.

To be successful in these types of tasks, ensure that you firstly check how many words you can use for an answer! The questions should state to fill out the table using “no more than ___ words” so be sure to follow this when filling out answers. You must also ensure that you carefully read the column headings so that you know the type of information you are looking for. The word(s) that you provide as an answer will create a sentence in the table. It is, therefore, recommended that you try to identify the type of word required (e.g. a verb, noun or adjective) and scan the text for this word type answer.

Finally, use the information from the table to identify which part of the text the answer is relevant to. Find this part of the text and search for the missing word(s) in this section. And remember that, generally, the answers will be in order in the text, so you are unlikely to locate the answer to the final question at the start of the text!

The Titanic Was on Fire for Days Before It Sank

Most people know the story of the Titanic—a massive luxury liner deemed the “unsinkable” ship. At the time of its completion, the Titanic was the largest man-made moving object on earth. The company building the ship was so sure it wouldn’t sink, they didn’t include enough lifeboats for all the passengers. Of course the ship wasn’t what it was advertised to be and sunk after hitting an iceberg. Approximately 1,500 people were lost with the ship, including many prominent citizens from multiple nations.

It’s an event known throughout history, a real-life event with the plot of a movie. In fact, one of the biggest movies ever made revolved around this tragedy. This disaster took place over 100 years ago and the name of the ship is still part of our common vocabulary.

However, despite the century that has passed, the Titanic story is still evolving. Everyone knows the base story about the ship hitting an iceberg, but one major piece missing for years has recently come to light. The Titanic was on fire for days as it was sailing, possibly longer than that. There was a coal fire below deck for days that the crew was unable to put out. The ship sailed along anyway with a fire burning in the hull.

Source: https://medium.com/s/story/the-titanic-was-on-fire-for-days-before-the-iceberg-hit-94fa26471dfa

Question

Complete the table below with information from the passage above. Choose no more than 3 words to fill in for each answer. Write the answers in the boxes below.

Event

Cause

When Titanic sank, __________ 1,500 passengers were lost.

The Titanic was said to be _____________, so there were not enough ____________ on board for all of the passengers.

A very popular movie that _____________ around this tragedy was made.

Although the ship sank __________________, it is still an important part of history.

It is now believed that there was a __________ on board, possibly for many days.

Below deck, there was a coal fire that ___________ tried and failed to put out.

Key Vocabulary:

liner: A large ship for carrying passengers in great comfort on long journeys.

deem: To consider or judge something in a particular way.

advertise: To make something known generally or in public, especially in order to sell it

sunk: Past participle of sink.

sank: Alternative past participle of ‘sink’

iceberg: A very large mass of ice that floats in the sea.

prominent: Very well known and important.

multiple: Many

plot: The story of a book, film, play, etc.

evolving: Present participle of evolve. To develop gradually, or to cause something or someone to develop gradually.

hull: The body or frame of a ship, most of which goes under the water.

Answers

Event

Cause

When Titanic sank, approximately 1,500 passengers were lost.

The Titanic was said to be unsinkable, so there were not enough lifeboats on board for all of the passengers.

A very popular movie that revolved around this tragedy was made.

Although the ship sank over 100 years ago, it is still an important part of history.

It is now believed that there was a (coal) fire on board, possibly for many days.

Below deck, there was a coal fire that the crew tried and failed to put out.

 

Choosing A Title: Practice 3

The ‘Choosing A Title’ question regularly appears in the IELTS reading paper. The purpose of this question is to determine a students’ understanding of the ‘big idea’ of a text. Students are required to select a title, that is the most appropriate for the whole passage, from a list of titles that are provided.

The skills involved in this test include:

  • Students identifying the ‘big idea’ in a passage
  • Students successfully recognising the differences between details and main ideas

In order to be successful in this test, follow our top tips for ‘Choosing A Title’ tasks:

  • Read through the whole passage.
  • Pay close attention to the opening and closing paragraphs to ensure you fully understand the ‘big idea’ of the text.
  • Read through the possible titles and identify which are only relevant to certain parts or paragraphs in the text.
  • Remember that all of the title options will be relevant to a part of the text – the skill needed is for you to pick the one that is representative of the whole passage, not just a part of it.
  • Don’t waste time! This question is only worth one point so do not spend too long on it.

 

Difficulty Level: Medium

This is a slightly shorter text with an easier content. There is some more complex vocabulary but these words are repeated throughout the text, lowering the overall number of difficult vocabulary.

 

Reading Passage

We tend to think of sleep as a time when the mind and body shut down. But this is not the case; sleep is an active period in which a lot of important processing, restoration, and strengthening occurs. Exactly how this happens and why our bodies are programmed for such a long period of slumber is still somewhat of a mystery. But scientists do understand some of sleep’s critical functions, and the reasons we need it for optimal health and wellbeing.

One of the vital roles of sleep is to help us solidify and consolidate memories. As we go about our day, our brains take in an incredible amount of information. Rather than being directly logged and recorded, however, these facts and experiences first need to be processed and stored; and many of these steps happen while we sleep. Overnight, bits and pieces of information are transferred from more tentative, short-term memory to stronger, long-term memory—a process called “consolidation.” Researchers have also shown that after people sleep, they tend to retain information and perform better on memory tasks. Our bodies all require long periods of sleep in order to restore and rejuvenate, to grow muscle, repair tissue, and synthesize hormones.

Healthy sleep is critical for everyone, since we all need to retain information and learn skills to thrive in life. But this is likely part of the reason children—who acquire language, social, and motor skills at a breathtaking pace throughout their development—need more sleep than adults. While adults need 7-9 hours of sleep per night, one-year-olds need roughly 11 to 14 hours, school age children between 9 and 11, and teenagers between 8 and 10. During these critical periods of growth and learning, younger people need a heavy dose of slumber for optimal development and alertness.

Source: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles

 

Question: Select the best title for this passage from the list of titles below (A-D).

  1. How Much Sleep Do We Need?
  2. What Is A Good Night’s Sleep?
  3. The Importance of Sleep for Young People
  4. Why Do We Need Sleep?

 

Key Vocabulary:

restoration: the act of returning something to its original condition (making it new again)

occurs: happens

slumber: sleep

optimal: the best, most favourable

solidify: to make stronger, to reinforce

consolidate: to combine into a single, more effective, whole

retain: continue to have something

thrive: to prosper, to flourish

acquire: to get

 

ANSWER

D.

Title A ‘How Much Sleep Do We Need’ is mostly discussed only in the third paragraph. This title does not refer to the big idea of the whole text.

Title B ‘What Is A Good Night’s Sleep’ is not really focused on in this article. It doesn’t specifically state what determines a good night’s sleep, apart from the reference to length of sleep in paragraph 3.

Title C ‘The Importance of Sleep for Young People’ is discussed in depth in the third paragraph but does not refer to the big idea of the whole text.

Choosing A Title: Practice 2

The ‘Choosing A Title’ question regularly appears in the IELTS reading paper. The purpose of this question is to determine a students’ understanding of the ‘big idea’ of a text. Students are required to select a title, that is the most appropriate for the whole passage, from a list of titles that are provided.

The skills involved in this test include:

  • Students identifying the ‘big idea’ in a passage
  • Students successfully recognising the differences between details and main ideas

In order to be successful in this test, follow our top tips for ‘Choosing A Title’ tasks:

  • Read through the whole passage.
  • Pay close attention to the opening and closing paragraphs to ensure you fully understand the ‘big idea’ of the text.
  • Read through the possible titles and identify which are only relevant to certain parts or paragraphs in the text.
  • Remember that all of the title options will be relevant to a part of the text – the skill needed is for you to pick the one that is representative of the whole passage, not just a part of it.
  • Don’t waste time! This question is only worth one point so do not spend too long on it.

Difficulty Level: Hard

Although this is a longer text, the vocabulary and content is not too difficult to understand.

 

Reading Passage

 If there was such a thing as a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. They’re readily available, easy to cook, affordable and packed with protein. “The egg is meant to be something that has all the right ingredients to grow an organism, so obviously it’s very nutrient dense,” says Christopher Blesso, associate professor of nutritional science at the University of Connecticut in the US.

Eating eggs alongside other food can help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. For example, one study found that adding an egg to salad can increase how much vitamin E we get from the salad. But for decades, eating eggs has also been controversial due to their high cholesterol content – which some studies have linked to an increased risk of heart disease. One egg yolk contains around 185 milligrams of cholesterol, which is more than half of the 300mg daily amount of cholesterol that the US dietary guidelines recommended until recently. Does that mean eggs, rather than being an ideal food, might actually be doing us harm?

Cholesterol, a yellowish fat produced in our liver and intestines, can be found in every one of our body’s cells. We normally think of it as “bad”. But cholesterol is a crucial building block in our cell membranes. It also is needed for the body to make vitamin D, and the hormones testosterone and oestrogen. We produce all the cholesterol we need on our own, but it’s also found in animal produce we consume, including beef, prawns and eggs, as well as cheese and butter. Cholesterol is transported around our body by lipoprotein molecules in the blood. Every person has a different combination of various types of lipoproteins, and our individual make-up plays a role in determining our risk of developing heart disease.

The discussion on the health effects of eggs has shifted partly because our bodies can compensate for the cholesterol we consume. “There are systems in place so that, for most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem,” says Elizabeth Johnson, research associate professor of nutritional sciences at Tufts University in Boston, US. In a 2015 review of 40 studies, Johnson and a team of researchers couldn’t find any conclusive evidence on the relationship between dietary cholesterol and heart disease. “Humans have good regulation when consuming dietary cholesterol, and will make less cholesterol themselves,” she says.

While researchers are a long way from understanding why eggs affect us differently, the vast majority of recent research suggests they pose no risk to our health, and are much more likely to provide health benefits. Even so, having eggs for breakfast every day probably isn’t healthiest option, either – at least as it’s recommended we have a varied diet… rather than put all our eggs in one basket.

Source: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190916-are-eggs-good-for-you

 

Question: Select the best title for this passage from the list of titles below (A-D).

  1. The Truth About Eating Eggs
  2. The Link Between Eggs and Cholesterol
  3. How The Human Body Processes Eggs
  4. The Negative Effects of Eggs on the Human Body

 

Key Vocabulary:

contender: a person or thing competing to be the best at something

readily available: something that can be obtained quickly and easily

organism: an individual animal or plant or single-celled life form

absorb: take in or soak up (a liquid or other substance)

controversial: something that is likely to cause controversery or disagreement

cholesterol: a type of fat found in the blood

shifted: changed in emphasis, direction or focus

compensate: to make up for

conclusive: having the effect of proving something

dietary: relating to ‘diet’ (the food someone eats)

 

ANSWER

A.

Title B ‘The Link Between Eggs and Cholesterol’ is discussed in the middle three paragraphs. However, if you pay close attention to the opening and closing paragraph, you will understand that talking about cholesterol and eggs is not the big idea in this text.

Title C ‘How The Human Body Processes Eggs’ is discussed in different ways throughout the article. However, this title does not encapsulate thoughts presented in the article about how some people say eggs can be healthy and others say they are unhealthy. Therefore, it is not reflective of the big idea in the text.

Title D ‘The Negative Effects of Eggs on the Human Body’ focuses only on the negative arguments presented, whereas the article actually presents both positive and negative arguments. Therefore, this does not refer to the big idea of the text.

Choosing A Title: Practice 1

The ‘Choosing A Title’ question regularly appears in the IELTS reading paper. The purpose of this question is to determine a students’ understanding of the ‘big idea’ of a text. Students are required to select a title, that is the most appropriate for the whole passage, from a list of titles that are provided.

The skills involved in this test include:

  • Students identifying the ‘big idea’ in a passage
  • Students successfully recognising the differences between details and main ideas

In order to be successful in this test, follow our top tips for ‘Choosing A Title’ tasks:

  • Read through the whole passage.
  • Pay close attention to the opening and closing paragraphs to ensure you fully understand the ‘big idea’ of the text.
  • Read through the possible titles and identify which are only relevant to certain parts or paragraphs in the text.
  • Remember that all of the title options will be relevant to a part of the text – the skill needed is for you to pick the one that is representative of the whole passage, not just a part of it.
  • Don’t waste time! This question is only worth one point so do not spend too long on it.

Difficulty Level: Hard

This is a long text to read with a lot of complex vocabulary for readers to comprehend.

 

Reading Passage

Some years ago, when several theoretical physicists, principally Dirk Helbing and Boris Kerner of Stuttgart, Germany, began publishing papers on traffic flow in publications normally read by traffic engineers, they were clearly working outside their usual sphere of investigation. They had noticed that if they simulated the movement of vehicles on a highway, using the equations that describe how the molecules of a gas move, some very strange results emerged. Of course, vehicles do not behave exactly like gas molecules: for example, drivers try to avoid collisions by slowing down when they get too near another vehicle, whereas gas molecules have no such concern. However, the physicists modified the equations to take the differences into account and the overall description of traffic as a flowing gas has proved to be a very good one; the moving-gas model of traffic reproduces many phenomena seen in real-world traffic.

The strangest thing that came out of these equations, however, was the implication that congestion can arise completely spontaneously; no external causes are necessary. Vehicles can be flowing freely along, at a density still well below what the road can handle, and then suddenly gel into a slow-moving ooze. Under the right conditions a brief and local fluctuation in the speed or the distance between vehicles is all it takes to trigger a system-wide breakdown that persists for hours. In fact, the physicists’ analysis suggested such spontaneous breakdowns in traffic flow probably occur quite frequently on highways.

Though a decidedly unsettling discovery, this showed striking similarities to the phenomena popularized as ‘chaos theory’. This theory has arisen from the understanding that in any complex interacting system which is made of many parts, each part affects the others. Consequently, tiny variations in one part of a complex system can grow in huge but unpredictable ways. This type of dramatic change from one state to another is similar to what happens when a chemical substance changes from a vapor to a liquid. It often happens that water in a cloud remains as a gas even after its temperature and density have reached the point where it could condense into water droplets. However, if the vapor encounters a solid surface, even something as small as a speck of dust, condensation can take place and the transition from vapor to liquid finally occurs. Helbing and Kerner see traffic as a complex interacting system. They found that a small fluctuation in traffic density can act as the ‘speck of dust’ causing a sudden change from freely moving traffic to synchronized traffic, when vehicles in all lanes abruptly slow down and start moving at the same speed, making passing impossible.

The physicists have challenged proposals to set a maximum capacity for vehicles on highways. They argue that it may not be enough simply to limit the rate at which vehicles are allowed to enter a highway, rather, it may be necessary to time each vehicle’s entry onto a highway precisely to coincide with a temporary drop in the density of vehicles along the road. The aim of doing this would be to smooth out any possible fluctuations in the road conditions that can trigger a change in traffic behavior and result in congestion. They further suggest that preventing breakdowns in the flow of traffic could ultimately require implementing the radical idea that has been suggested from time to time: directly regulating the speed and spacing of individual cars along a highway with central computers and sensors that communicate with each car’s engine and brake controls.

However, research into traffic control is generally centered in civil engineering departments and here the theories of the physicists have been greeted with some skepticism. Civil engineers favor a practical approach to problems and believe traffic congestion is the result of poor road construction (two lanes becoming one lane or dangerous curves), which constricts the flow of traffic. Engineers questioned how well the physicists’ theoretical results relate to traffic in the real world. Indeed, some engineering researchers questioned whether elaborate chaos-theory interpretations are needed at all, since at least some of the traffic phenomena the physicists’ theories predicted seemed to be similar to observations that had been appearing in traffic engineering literature under other names for years; observations which had straightforward cause-and-effect explanations.

James Banks, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at San Diego State University in the US, suggested that a sudden slowdown in traffic may have less to do with chaos theory than with driver psychology. As traffic gets heavier and the passing lane gets more crowded, aggressive drivers move to other lanes to try to pass, which also tends to even out the speed between lanes. He also felt that another leveling force is that when a driver in a fast lane brakes a little to maintain a safe distance between vehicles, the shock wave travels back much more rapidly than it would in the other slower lanes, because each following driver has to react more quickly. Consequently, as a road becomes congested, the faster moving traffic is the first to slow down.

 

Source: © 2000 The Atlantic Media Co., as first published in The Atlantic Magazine. All rights reserved. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency.

 

Question: Select the best title for this passage from the list of titles below (A-D).

  1. Traffic Control
  2. Chaos Theory
  3. The Physics of Traffic Behaviour
  4. The Flow of Traffic

 

Key Vocabulary:

theoretical: concerned with the theory of a subject

physicist: a student or an expert in the science of physics

sphere: a particular area of interest or expertise

simulate: produced a computer model of

emerge: something that becomes apparent or prominent

modify: to change something from its original form

implication: a consequence of something happening

congestion: the state of being congested; something that is overcrowded

synchronise: things that occur at the same time and/or speed

density: the degree to which a substance is compacted

skepticism: to doubt the truth of something

constrict: to make narrower, to tighten control of something

 

ANSWER

C.

Title A ‘Traffic Control’ is discussed in the second to last paragraph. It is not the main focus for all paragraphs in the article.

Title B ‘Chaos Theory’ is discussed in the third paragraph. It is not the main focus for all paragraphs in the article.

Title D ‘The Flow of Traffic’ is discussed throughout much of the passage but this title does not incorporate the link made between traffic and physics that is explicitly introduced in the opening paragraph.

Multiple Choice Task: Practice 3

In multiple choice reading tasks in IELTS, you will answer questions about a reading passage. The questions will provide 3-4 possible options and you need to choose the correct answer. This involves using your scanning skills to locate the relevant information to answer the question, your comprehension skills to understand the text and your ability to paraphrase information.

 

To help support you with the multiple choice tasks in IELTS, here are some of our top tips.

 

  • Read the question carefully. Be sure that you understand the question so that you don’t get caught out.
  • Locate the correct information in the passage and use this to select the best answer.
  • Do not spend too long on this task – each question is worth one mark only.
  • Remember, answers will usually be in order.
  • Make sure you know how to show your answer – do you need to provide a letter or number to show the option you are choosing?
  • Take the time to ensure you are answering the question – just because a number in one of the answers is also in the text doesn’t mean it is the CORRECT answer!

 

As with any part of the IELTS test, practice makes perfect. So be sure to use our other Multiple Choice Practice Tasks to help develop your ability and skill.

 

Passage:

 

Climate change: Met Office says warming trend will continue in 2020

 

Next year will continue the global warming trend with temperatures again likely to rise more than one degree above pre-industrial levels. According to the Met Office, 2020 will likely be 1.11C warmer than the average between 1850-1900. The year ahead is set to extend the series of the warmest years on record to six in a row.

Scientists say the strongest factor causing the rise is greenhouse gas emissions. The world first broke through one degree above pre-industrial temperatures back in 2015. Each year since then has seen temperatures close to or above this mark. The warmest year on record is 2016 when a strong El Niño made a significant difference.

 

This weather phenomenon sees sea surface temperatures increase in the central and eastern Pacific and it’s associated with a range of impacts around the world, including the overall global level of warming. According to the Met Office, the chances of a strong El Niño in 2020 are low. They forecast that the global average temperature next year will be in the range of 0.99C to 1.23C with a central estimate of 1.11C. The researchers say that the key factor will be emissions of CO2 and other warming gases. “Natural events – such as El Niño-induced warming in the Pacific – influence the climate system, but in the absence of El Niño, this forecast gives a clear picture of the strongest factor causing temperatures to rise – greenhouse gas emissions,” said Professor Adam Scaife, the Met Office head of long-range prediction.

 

According to researchers, carbon dioxide emissions this year have risen slightly, despite a drop in the use of coal. The Global Carbon Project’s annual analysis of emission trends suggests that CO2 will go up by 0.6% in 2019. The rise is due to continuing strong growth in the utilisation of oil and gas. The scale of emissions has a direct bearing on temperatures, scientists say. Provisional figures released earlier this month by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggest 2019 is on course to be the second or third warmest year ever. If those numbers hold, 2015-2019 would end up being the warmest five-year period on record.

 

The Met Office say they have confidence in their prediction for 2020 based on what’s happened in previous years. This time last year they estimated that 2019 would be 1.10C above the 1850-1900 mark. The actual temperature recorded this year from January to October shows a global mean 1.11C.

 

Text adapted from: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50839974

 

Questions:

 

Choose the correct letter A-C.

 

  1. Next year, meteorologists predict that temperatures will:
  2. increase
  3. decrease
  4. stay the same

 

  1. If the temperature next year rises, it will be the ____ time this has happened continuously.
    1. 1st
    2. 6th
    3. 2016

 

  1. What is the likelihood of another El Niño happening next year?
    1. likely
    2. unlikely
    3. probable

 

  1. Carbon dioxide, produced by the burning of coal, has _____ this year.
    1. Increased significantly
    2. dropped
    3. increased

 

  1. These scientists are confident in their predictions because:
    1. Their predictions for 2019 were correct
    2. Their predictions for 2019 were very close
    3. Their predictions have been correct for the past five years

Answers:

 

  1. a
  2. b
  3. b
  4. c
  5. b

 

New Vocabulary to Learn!

 

meteorologists = scientists who study the weather

predict = to say or estimate that something will happen

factor = something that contributes to a result

emissions = the act of sending out gas, heat or light into the air

phenomenon = something that exists or happens

probable = something that is likely to happen

Multiple Choice Task: Practice 2

In multiple choice reading tasks in IELTS, you will answer questions about a reading passage. The questions will provide 3-4 possible options and you need to choose the correct answer. This involves using your scanning skills to locate the relevant information to answer the question, your comprehension skills to understand the text and your ability to paraphrase information.

 

To help support you with the multiple choice tasks in IELTS, here are some of our top tips.

 

  • Read the question carefully. Be sure that you understand the question so that you don’t get caught out.
  • Locate the correct information in the passage and use this to select the best answer.
  • Do not spend too long on this task – each question is worth one mark only.
  • Remember, answers will usually be in order.
  • Make sure you know how to show your answer – do you need to provide a letter or number to show the option you are choosing?
  • Take the time to ensure you are answering the question – just because a number in one of the answers is also in the text doesn’t mean it is the CORRECT answer!

 

As with any part of the IELTS test, practice makes perfect. So be sure to use our other Multiple Choice Practice Tasks to help develop your ability and skill.

 

Passage:

 

China Bans Children Playing Video Games

 

China has announced drastic curfew measures on children in an attempt to curb video game addiction in the country. Gamers under the age of 18 will be banned from playing online games for more than 90 minutes on week days and will be forbidden from playing between 10pm and 8am. On weekends and public holidays they will be allowed to play up to three hours per day.

 

Official government guidelines outlining the new restrictions were issued by China’s General Administration of Press and Publication and will be imposed directly through gaming platforms operating in the country. A spokesperson for the administration told state-run Xinhua News Agency that the measures were designed to protect the “physical and mental health of minors”. The rules also include limitations on the amount of money children can spend within games, with gamers under 16 years old allowed to spend up to 200 yuan (£22) per month, and those between 16 and 18 able to spend 400 yuan.

 

China is the world’s second biggest gaming market behind the US but authorities in the country have repeatedly criticised the negative impact video games can have on young people. A study in 2015 found that 500 million Chinese citizens suffered from visual impairment, which researchers blamed on the rise of mobile phones and online games.

 

Last year, the World Health Organisation recognised video game addiction as an mental health disorder. Internet gaming disorder causes someone to have “significant issues with functioning” due to the addiction, according to the organisation. It is officially characterised by “impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences”.

 

Text adapted from: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/gaming/china-gaming-ban-video-game-addiction-a9188806.html

 

Questions:

 

Choose the correct letter A-D.

 

  1. Children are allowed to play computer games for how long on Saturday and Sundays in China?
  2. Less than 3 hours per day
  3. More than 3 hours per day
  4. 0 hours
  5. Between 10pm and 8am

 

  1. Children over 16 are allowed to spend how much per month on gaming in China?
    1. Less than 200 yuan
    2. More than 400 yuan
    3. Exactly 200 yuan
    4. Up to 400 yuan

 

  1. What illness do Chinese authorities blame on the over use of computer games?
    1. drug addiction
    2. sight problems
    3. alcohol addiction
    4. joint problems

 

Answers:

 

  1. a
  2. d
  3. b

 

New Vocabulary to Learn!

 

visual impairment = loss of the ability to see

drastic = something that is radical or extreme

curfew = an order specifying a time during which certain rules apply

curb = to put a restrain on something; to stop something

forbidden = not allowed

outlining = a general description or plan showing the main features of something

restrictions = rules that limit or control someone

imposed = forced on someone

limitations = restrictions

characterised = the typical features of something

Multiple Choice Task: Practice 1

In multiple choice reading tasks in IELTS, you will answer questions about a reading passage. The questions will provide 3-4 possible options and you need to choose the correct answer. This involves using your scanning skills to locate the relevant information to answer the question, your comprehension skills to understand the text and your ability to paraphrase information.

 

To help support you with the multiple choice tasks in IELTS, here are some of our top tips.

 

  • Read the question carefully. Be sure that you understand the question so that you don’t get caught out.
  • Locate the correct information in the passage and use this to select the best answer.
  • Do not spend too long on this task – each question is worth one mark only.
  • Remember, answers will usually be in order.
  • Make sure you know how to show your answer – do you need to provide a letter or number to show the option you are choosing?
  • Take the time to ensure you are answering the question – just because a number in one of the answers is also in the text doesn’t mean it is the CORRECT answer!

 

As with any part of the IELTS test, practice makes perfect. So be sure to use our other Multiple Choice Practice Tasks to help develop your ability and skill.

 

Passage:

World Water Day

 

Water is vital. Between 55 and 60 per cent of the adult body is made of it and every living cell needs it to keep functioning. In normal conditions, the human body can only survive three or four days without water. We need water to stay alive, yet there are billions of people all over the world who do not have access to safe drinking water.

 

The first World Water Day was celebrated in 1993. It was first proposed at the United Nations (UN) conference on environment and development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and has been celebrated annually on 22 March since then. Every year the UN releases its World Water Development Report on or around this date. Each year has a different theme, looking at things like the role of clean water in the world of work, ways to stop wasting water, finding ways to supply water to underprivileged groups and so on.

 

Clean drinking water is fundamental. But it is also vital for sanitation and hygiene. It is estimated that more than 700 children under the age of seven die every day from illnesses linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. The right to water and sanitation was recognised as a human right by the UN General Assembly in 2010. However, there are still at least 2.1 billion people around the world who live without safe water in their homes. These include rural communities, people who have been displaced due to war and local conflicts and areas where climate change is making water more and more scarce.

 

Apart from the obvious health issues, a lack of accessible clean water means that people – often women and children – spend hours every day walking to and from distant water supplies. This means they don’t have time to dedicate to work, studies and other domestic duties. The search for water becomes their main occupation. And people who are not able to walk to get their own water are particularly vulnerable.

 

For many people, access to water has become increasingly difficult due to increased demand for a finite resource. According to figures released by the UN, around 4 billion people – nearly two-thirds of the world’s population – experience severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year. It is believed that by 2030 as many as 700 million people worldwide could be displaced by intense water scarcity.

 

Text adapted from: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/general-english/magazine/world-water-day

 

Questions:

 

Choose the correct letter A-D.

 

  1. What percentage of the human body is made up of water?
  2. 55-60% of all human bodies
  3. Less than 55%
  4. More than 60%
  5. 55-60% of fully developed bodies

 

  1. When was World Water Day initially suggested to the UN?
    1. 1993
    2. 1992
    3. 22nd March
    4. annually

 

  1. How many children die daily from drinking dirty water?
    1. Less than 700
    2. 700
    3. Over 700
    4. Below 700

 

  1. Which people does the article say continue to live without access to sanitised water today?
    1. People in large continents
    2. People living in small towns outside major cities
    3. People in war zones
    4. People in Rio de Janeiro

 

  1. By 2030, around 700 million people will:
    1. Die due to lack of clean water
    2. Have access to clean water
    3. Have to move due to lack of clean water
    4. Exist on earth

 

Answers:

 

  1. d
  2. b
  3. c
  4. b
  5. c

 

New Vocabulary to Learn!

 

sanitise = make clean and hygenic

sanitation = making something clean and hygenic

displace = force someone to leave their home (normally due to war or natural disaster)

propose = suggest

initially = at first

daily = every day

rural = the country

vulnerable = at risk

scarcity = in short supply, scarce

fundamental = very important

Sentence Completion Task: Practice 3

In the sentence completion task of the IELTS Reading test, you will be asked to complete sentences by using a word, short phrase or number from the text to fill gaps. In order to complete this task well, you need to be able to locate specific information, understand a short passage of text and choose the most appropriate word. Therefore, you will benefit from improving your paraphrasing skills, skimming and scanning skills and, most importantly, your reading comprehension (no doubt the MOST important skill to be successful in the IELTS Reading test).

 

Here are some top tips to ensure your success with this type of question in the IELTS test.

  • Think about which type of word is required in the gap – is it a noun, an adjective or a verb?
  • Check that the sentence is grammatically correct when the word is inserted!
  • Consider the topic of the sentence and where that information is located in the passage.
  • The answers to the questions will (normally!) come in order in the text. Use this to help you locate where in the text the answer may be located.
  • Ensure that you double check whether the answer is asking for one word, two words or a number as the answer.

 

As with any part of the IELTS test, practice makes perfect. So be sure to use our Sentence Completion Practice Tasks and other Reading Practice Tasks to help develop your ability and skill.

 

Passage:

 

Denman Glacier: Deepest point on land found in Antarctica

 

The deepest point on continental Earth has been identified in East Antarctica, under Denman Glacier. This ice-filled canyon reaches 3.5km (11,500ft) below sea level. Only in the ocean are the valleys deeper still. The discovery is illustrated in a new map of the White Continent that reveals the shape of the bedrock under the ice sheet in unprecedented detail. Its features will be critical to our understanding of how the polar south might change in the future. For comparison, the lowest exposed land on Earth, at the Dead Sea shore, is just 413m (1,355ft) below sea level.

 

The new finding shows, for example, previously unrecognised ridges that will impede the retreat of melting glaciers in a warming world; and, alternatively, a number of smooth, sloping terrains that could accelerate withdrawals. “This is undoubtedly the most accurate portrait yet of what lies beneath Antarctica’s ice sheet,” said Dr Mathieu Morlighem, who’s worked on the project for six years.

 

Text adapted from: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50753113

 

Questions:

 

Complete the following sentences. Choose no more than two words from the passage to fill the gaps.

 

  1. A place in _____________________ is now said to be the place that extends the furthest down from the Earth’s surface.

 

  1. However, _______________ located in the sea are said to extend even further.

 

  1. An _______________ map, called the White Continent, shows this new discovery in very close detail.

 

  1. The shore of the Dead Sea is the _________________ visible land.

 

  1. _________________ located at the deepest point will help to limit the recession of glaciers due to the effects of global warming.

 

 

Answers:

 

  1. East Antarctica
  2. valleys
  3. unprecedented
  4. lowest
  5. ridges

 

 

New Vocabulary to Learn!

 

valleys = a low area of land between mountains or hills

unprecedented = something that has never been done before

ridges = a long, narrow hilltop or mountain range

extend = make larger

shore = the land along the edge of the sea

visible = something that can be seen

recession = to move back

impede = to delay something or obstruct something from happening

terrains =  a stretch of land